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Thread: The worlds most valuable commodity.

  1. #46
    Complete & Utter Member j.m@talk's Avatar
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    Err no ...... I'm more thinking depravity, perverts & violence .......


  2. #47
    Registered User mireland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by j.m@talk View Post
    Err no ...... I'm more thinking depravity, perverts & violence .......
    oh? Xmas?

  3. #48
    Ultimate Member herosrest's Avatar
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    Some research. Totally useless but interesting stuff that just links in to itself in a beautiful symmetry of purpose

    In late 1941 the 36th Pursuit Squadron moved to San Francisco, California in preparation for a deployment to the Asian Theater of Operations. The squadron sailed for Brisbane, Australia aboard the SS Mauri on February 12, 1942, a voyage that took 24 days. The squadron trained with P-39s at Lowood, Queenland and later at Antil Plains near Townsville, Australia. On April 20, 1942, the squadron moved to Seven-Mile Drome - CLICK near Port Moresby, New Guinea, which was the last remaining allied stronghold north of Australia. The first contingent flew up in transports on the 26th, and the pilots flew the P-39s up on the 28th. They encountered severe weather and lost 15 planes en route. It was a staggering blow to both Americans and Australians. Another 26 P-39s arrived safely on the 30th. ANECDOTE

    The first combat mission for the 36th PS took place on April 30, 1942. Tasked with a strafing mission at Lae Salamaua, New Guinea, the aircrews encountered 15 to 20 Japanese Zeros. The ensuing dogfight lasted all the way back to Port Moresby. Two pilots of the 36th, Captain Paul G. Brown - CLICK and Captain James J. Bevlock, were forced to land. Capt. Brown claimed probable destruction of one Zero. During the entire war, the 36th would lose 56 men listed as killed or missing in action.

    From April through June 1942, more than 300 enemy planes flew sorties over Seven-Mile Drome in an effort to soften Allied defenses and eliminate Allied air power in that area, prior to a major Japanese invasion effort. The now redesignated 36th Fighter Squadron defended the Drome and claimed 21 enemy planes destroyed during 94 individual combat engagements. The squadron lost 10 planes, but five pilots were saved. Rations were destroyed for the most part and the aircrews lived on bread, jam and tea. 1st Lt. Donald G. McGee was credited with the squadron's first confirmed victory when he shot down a Zero over the Seven-Mile Drome on May 1, 1942. While the 36th FS was establishing its ground echelon force at Port Moresby, the battle of the Coral Sea was underway. In this decisive naval engagement, the Japanese were rebuffed in their efforts to land an invasion force in the vicinity of Port Moresby, thereby marking the beginning of Allied efforts to stem the tide of Japanese conquest.

    After three months of heavy combat operations, the pilots and ground crews of the 36th got some welcome relief from another squadron and returned to their former camp near Townsville. Some of the men were suffering from malaria and dengue fever. The reunion of the squadron at Townsville was a cause for great celebration. The kitchen was opened with coffee and sandwiches, a huge stack of mail was waiting to be opened, and in the middle of the room were three large barrels of beer…and the party ended at 3:00 AM.

    The Japanese sent several planes to bomb Townsville in late July 1942. After the first incident, the pilots of the 36th took to the skies to defend the city. Unfortunately, local antiaircraft batteries made it very dangerous to pursue enemy aircraft. After closer coordination with ground forces, the 36th attacked the invaders on the night of August 1, 1942 and sent the enemy planes hurtling to the ground in flames.

    By September 1942 the 36th FS was located at Milne Bay, New Guinea, and equipped with P-39 Airacobras. They performed patrol and reconnaissance missions, escorted transports, protected Allied shipping to the area of Milne Bay, and during December 1942, patrolled the area between Port Moresby and Buna, New Guinea. Enemy opposition was encountered on only two occasions, the 7th and 28th of December. On the anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, Lt. George S. Welsh, ANECDOTE who had destroyed four enemy aircraft one year earlier, shot down three Japanese planes near Buna.
    Last edited by herosrest; 12-26-2008 at 03:23 AM.

  4. #49
    Ultimate Member herosrest's Avatar
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    The following is an account by at 2d Lt Donald McGee assigned to the 36th Pursuit Squadron:

    We sailed from San Francisco on January 6, 1942. Our unescorted convoy consisted of the S.S Mariposa and the S.S President Coolidge. After we arrived in Melbourne, Australia, on January 31, the 9th Squadron was sent to the Williamtown RAAF station, near Newcastle, where we waited for our planes to arrive. None of us had yet flown fighter aircraft, so we tried to snatch a few flying hours in a Wirraway loaned to us by the RAAF. Also, I jumped into a wrecked P-40E as often as possible to "cockpit-check" myself-when our P-40s started to arrive, I wanted to be one of the first to check out. After being designated to fly "that one over there," I grabbed the bit and ran. But the exuberance of youth wasn't all that was required to do the job right and, in less than an hour, I found myself in pretty much the same state as the guy who had wrecked that other P-40. Not long after this, the 49th Group started receiving pilots who had had combat experience in the Philippines and Java, so most of us were transferred to the 8th Pursuit Group, which was then arriving in Brisbane. When the experienced combat pilots had trained my fellow novices who remained with the unit, the 49th moved up to Darwin. Meantime, my contemporaries and I from the 9th Squadron were assigned to the 8th Group's 36th Squadron when we reached Lowood Station, near Brisbane. We began checking out in P-39Ds.

    Then we moved to Antil Plains, a grass strip near Townsville. Most of us had, ten to fifteen hours of fighter transition but no high-performance or gunnery training when we were ordered to proceed to Port Moresby, New Guinea. The 36th Pursuit Squadron left Townsville for Port Moresby on April 26, 1942, stopping that night at Cairns. Both the 35th Squadron, from Woodstock, and the 36th Squadron, from Antil Plains, made this move together. We stayed at Cairns on April 27, probably to patch up a few broken birds. I logged a 40-minute local flight there in the afternoon. This was probably to check out work on my prop, since I was flying an F-model P-39 whose prop spattered oil all over the windshield and took out any forward vision. On April 28, we moved on to Horn Island, arriving there just after a raid by the Japanese. Their leavings were a burned-up B-25 and a couple of wrecked Aussie aircraft. We flew a field-cover mission right after arrival, and I logged two hours and 30 minutes. Next day, on April 30, we took off for Port Moresby; ruining our arrival to be after noon because we expected that any raids by the Japanese would be over by then. We were 'told that the runway at 7-Mile Strip was very narrow and that we should clear straight ahead after landing and then taxi back on the dirt track at our right. By the time we arrived, ole Lucky Pierre here had a windshield full of dust and prop oil again, so another blind landing was necessary. That was no big deal except that Izzy Toubman, our operations officer, was taxiing back on the runway as I came in. I couldn't see his plane until just before we hit wingtips - my left to his left. This wouldn't have been a big deal, because the damage was slight, but it kept me off our first attack on Lae.

    This attack was cooked up and led by Lieutenant Colonel Boyd "Buzz" Wagner, from V Fighter Command, that same afternoon. I stopped my *****ing about this turn of events by extracting a promise from 1/Lt Bill Meng, our acting CO, that I'd be on the first field-cover patrol the next day. That promise was kept, and it resulted in my shooting down the 36th's first Zero. That day, May 1, we were out of bed at about 0400; had a breakfast of bread, Australian canned jam, and tea; and got to the flight line before daylight. Leading the field-cover patrol was 1/Lt Don Mainwaring. On his wing was 2/Lt Patrick "Army" Armstrong. I led the second element, but my wingman never got airborne. The three of us climbed to about 8,000 feet and covered an area north and northwest of the field, expecting to meet any raids coming in from Lae. After two hours or so we were supposed to be relieved, so Don started back toward the field and set us up in trail formation for landing. We peeled normally and took our distance for landing, but, as I broke, I could see that the near half of the runway was covered in ground fog. Don continued his pattern and tried to land through the fog, but he hit hard and wiped out his landing gear. He called on the radio and told us not to try to land, that the runway was blocked. Army and I pulled up and broke out of the traffic pattern. Army chose to stay down low because he was low on gas, but I told him I was going to get some altitude. I was low on gas, too, but I didn't want to get caught down there if a raid came in. Also, if I ran out of fuel before the runway was cleared, I wanted to be able to pick a soft spot to dead-stick it in. I had just reached 3,500 feet when our controller started yelling, "Zeros attacking the field!" I looked back and started a turn toward the field, but I didn't see any Zeros. Then I gulped and checked my gas. The gauges registered just under 20 gallons, which, in combat, would last about 9 minutes. I was heading in a northerly direction when I saw a single Zero making a run from south to north across our revetment area. I had a debate with myself here, the gist of which was, `It's not smart to jump into a fight with no gas. I'm down low at low airspeed. I can't out-turn a Zero. They left me off the mission yesterday. **** on it, I'm goin’ in !

    I rolled in on the Zero and pushed over. To conserve fuel, I did not push it to full power. The pilot of the Zero hadn't seen me, and I didn't see several other Zeros above. As I closed in-too slowly-I tried to figure out which crossbar in, the gunsight I was supposed to use. Giving up, I simply worked the whole sight out in front of the enemy plane and fired a burst at about 40 degrees deflection. The tracers flew by the Zero on the right side. I adjusted-my lead and fired another burst. The tracers flew by just under my target. Adjusting again, I pulled the sight farther out in front, raised rit some, and fired at about 15 degrees deflection. This time, the tracers covered an area in front of and all around the :enemy plane. There was no fire or smoke, but the Zero rolled slowly to the left as if to start a split-S. I followed the Zero, but, suddenly, I realized that we were only about 150 feet off the ground ! I pulled out at just about the level of the trees and saw the explosion over my right shoulder as the Zero hit the ground. I assume my bullets had the pilot. Then all hell broke loose. A mess of red balls surrounded coming from my left, so I automatically broke hard left, fled too hard, snap-stalled as I tightened the turn, popped the stick (quickly pushed it forward to break the stall), and overed. Then I was surrounded by red balls coming from the right, so I yanked the airplane around to the right: suddenly realizing that I had given one of my pursuers a sharp, no-deflection shot, I thought, "I got me one, but I'm gonna be around to tell anybody about it." As I racked plane around to the right, I snap-stalled again, spun, and veered just about at treetop level. I was now headed not for Port Moresby, but the sea, so I hugged the treetops, and started jinking violently so I could keep those others from getting a good shot at me. That I had the good sense to do the jinking, I attribute to Captain Ajax Baumler, who had shot down 8 planes while flying for the Loyalists in the Spanish Civil War and had been our tactics instructor at Selma.

    I looked back and saw that I had three Zeros lined up in back of me. The closest one was getting a burst in now and then. He missed me on my right, on my left, and over the top, so I knew the jinking was working well, but it still made me flinch when I saw the guns blinking at me. I wondered what it was going to feel like when I got hit. But, one by one, they gave up the chase. Then I only had to think about how far I'd have to swim home if my gas gave out before I reached land again. As soon as the last Zero left, I turned around immediately, staying down on the water. I practically followed the last Zero in as he climbed out to the north. Then, as I crossed the south end of 7-Mile Strip, still at treetop level, I dropped the gear, made a left pattern, and landed. As I turned off the runway, I saw that several of the ground crewmen were pointing at my airplane, so, with pride in my victory, I stuck my arm out of the window and held up one finger. Then the engine quit - out of gas. The pointing, I learned, was at the damage to my aircraft. It had taken two 20mm hits in the tail, one on each side of the rudderpost, with plenty of little shrapnel holes in the horizontal stabilizer and elevators. There were five 7.7mm holes in the left wing root, four in the right wing root, and one in the top of my canopy. That one had taken my sunglasses off my head without even scratching me (the glasses were a mess, though).

    The shooter's cowl guns had apparently straddled me. The Zero I shot down was the first confirmed victory for the 36th Pursuit Squadron. Confirmation was easy since the Zero had gone down only about a mile from the field. Later confirmations were a lot more difficult to come by, and several were lost entirely. The Zero shot down was that flown by Petty Officer First Class Yoshisuke Arita. It crashed on top of a hill, later named by the Americans as “Bitsabishi Hill”.


  5. #50
    Registered User BadDriver's Avatar
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    Put it short words. I ain't reading all that shizz for entertainment.

  6. #51
    Registered User BadDriver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by herosrest View Post
    The following is an account by at 2d Lt Donald McGee assigned to the 36th Pursuit Squadron:

    We sailed from San Francisco on January 6, 1942. Our unescorted convoy consisted of the S.S Mariposa and the S.S President Coolidge. After we arrived in Melbourne, Australia, on January 31, the 9th Squadron was sent to the Williamtown RAAF station, near Newcastle, where we waited for our planes to arrive. None of us had yet flown fighter aircraft, so we tried to snatch a few flying hours in a Wirraway loaned to us by the RAAF. Also, I jumped into a wrecked P-40E as often as possible to "cockpit-check" myself-when our P-40s started to arrive, I wanted to be one of the first to check out. After being designated to fly "that one over there," I grabbed the bit and ran. But the exuberance of youth wasn't all that was required to do the job right and, in less than an hour, I found myself in pretty much the same state as the guy who had wrecked that other P-40. Not long after this, the 49th Group started receiving pilots who had had combat experience in the Philippines and Java, so most of us were transferred to the 8th Pursuit Group, which was then arriving in Brisbane. When the experienced combat pilots had trained my fellow novices who remained with the unit, the 49th moved up to Darwin. Meantime, my contemporaries and I from the 9th Squadron were assigned to the 8th Group's 36th Squadron when we reached Lowood Station, near Brisbane. We began checking out in P-39Ds.

    Then we moved to Antil Plains, a grass strip near Townsville. Most of us had, ten to fifteen hours of fighter transition but no high-performance or gunnery training when we were ordered to proceed to Port Moresby, New Guinea. The 36th Pursuit Squadron left Townsville for Port Moresby on April 26, 1942, stopping that night at Cairns. Both the 35th Squadron, from Woodstock, and the 36th Squadron, from Antil Plains, made this move together. We stayed at Cairns on April 27, probably to patch up a few broken birds. I logged a 40-minute local flight there in the afternoon. This was probably to check out work on my prop, since I was flying an F-model P-39 whose prop spattered oil all over the windshield and took out any forward vision. On April 28, we moved on to Horn Island, arriving there just after a raid by the Japanese. Their leavings were a burned-up B-25 and a couple of wrecked Aussie aircraft. We flew a field-cover mission right after arrival, and I logged two hours and 30 minutes. Next day, on April 30, we took off for Port Moresby; ruining our arrival to be after noon because we expected that any raids by the Japanese would be over by then. We were 'told that the runway at 7-Mile Strip was very narrow and that we should clear straight ahead after landing and then taxi back on the dirt track at our right. By the time we arrived, ole Lucky Pierre here had a windshield full of dust and prop oil again, so another blind landing was necessary. That was no big deal except that Izzy Toubman, our operations officer, was taxiing back on the runway as I came in. I couldn't see his plane until just before we hit wingtips - my left to his left. This wouldn't have been a big deal, because the damage was slight, but it kept me off our first attack on Lae.

    This attack was cooked up and led by Lieutenant Colonel Boyd "Buzz" Wagner, from V Fighter Command, that same afternoon. I stopped my *****ing about this turn of events by extracting a promise from 1/Lt Bill Meng, our acting CO, that I'd be on the first field-cover patrol the next day. That promise was kept, and it resulted in my shooting down the 36th's first Zero. That day, May 1, we were out of bed at about 0400; had a breakfast of bread, Australian canned jam, and tea; and got to the flight line before daylight. Leading the field-cover patrol was 1/Lt Don Mainwaring. On his wing was 2/Lt Patrick "Army" Armstrong. I led the second element, but my wingman never got airborne. The three of us climbed to about 8,000 feet and covered an area north and northwest of the field, expecting to meet any raids coming in from Lae. After two hours or so we were supposed to be relieved, so Don started back toward the field and set us up in trail formation for landing. We peeled normally and took our distance for landing, but, as I broke, I could see that the near half of the runway was covered in ground fog. Don continued his pattern and tried to land through the fog, but he hit hard and wiped out his landing gear. He called on the radio and told us not to try to land, that the runway was blocked. Army and I pulled up and broke out of the traffic pattern. Army chose to stay down low because he was low on gas, but I told him I was going to get some altitude. I was low on gas, too, but I didn't want to get caught down there if a raid came in. Also, if I ran out of fuel before the runway was cleared, I wanted to be able to pick a soft spot to dead-stick it in. I had just reached 3,500 feet when our controller started yelling, "Zeros attacking the field!" I looked back and started a turn toward the field, but I didn't see any Zeros. Then I gulped and checked my gas. The gauges registered just under 20 gallons, which, in combat, would last about 9 minutes. I was heading in a northerly direction when I saw a single Zero making a run from south to north across our revetment area. I had a debate with myself here, the gist of which was, `It's not smart to jump into a fight with no gas. I'm down low at low airspeed. I can't out-turn a Zero. They left me off the mission yesterday. **** on it, I'm goin’ in !

    I rolled in on the Zero and pushed over. To conserve fuel, I did not push it to full power. The pilot of the Zero hadn't seen me, and I didn't see several other Zeros above. As I closed in-too slowly-I tried to figure out which crossbar in, the gunsight I was supposed to use. Giving up, I simply worked the whole sight out in front of the enemy plane and fired a burst at about 40 degrees deflection. The tracers flew by the Zero on the right side. I adjusted-my lead and fired another burst. The tracers flew by just under my target. Adjusting again, I pulled the sight farther out in front, raised rit some, and fired at about 15 degrees deflection. This time, the tracers covered an area in front of and all around the :enemy plane. There was no fire or smoke, but the Zero rolled slowly to the left as if to start a split-S. I followed the Zero, but, suddenly, I realized that we were only about 150 feet off the ground ! I pulled out at just about the level of the trees and saw the explosion over my right shoulder as the Zero hit the ground. I assume my bullets had the pilot. Then all hell broke loose. A mess of red balls surrounded coming from my left, so I automatically broke hard left, fled too hard, snap-stalled as I tightened the turn, popped the stick (quickly pushed it forward to break the stall), and overed. Then I was surrounded by red balls coming from the right, so I yanked the airplane around to the right: suddenly realizing that I had given one of my pursuers a sharp, no-deflection shot, I thought, "I got me one, but I'm gonna be around to tell anybody about it." As I racked plane around to the right, I snap-stalled again, spun, and veered just about at treetop level. I was now headed not for Port Moresby, but the sea, so I hugged the treetops, and started jinking violently so I could keep those others from getting a good shot at me. That I had the good sense to do the jinking, I attribute to Captain Ajax Baumler, who had shot down 8 planes while flying for the Loyalists in the Spanish Civil War and had been our tactics instructor at Selma.

    I looked back and saw that I had three Zeros lined up in back of me. The closest one was getting a burst in now and then. He missed me on my right, on my left, and over the top, so I knew the jinking was working well, but it still made me flinch when I saw the guns blinking at me. I wondered what it was going to feel like when I got hit. But, one by one, they gave up the chase. Then I only had to think about how far I'd have to swim home if my gas gave out before I reached land again. As soon as the last Zero left, I turned around immediately, staying down on the water. I practically followed the last Zero in as he climbed out to the north. Then, as I crossed the south end of 7-Mile Strip, still at treetop level, I dropped the gear, made a left pattern, and landed. As I turned off the runway, I saw that several of the ground crewmen were pointing at my airplane, so, with pride in my victory, I stuck my arm out of the window and held up one finger. Then the engine quit - out of gas. The pointing, I learned, was at the damage to my aircraft. It had taken two 20mm hits in the tail, one on each side of the rudderpost, with plenty of little shrapnel holes in the horizontal stabilizer and elevators. There were five 7.7mm holes in the left wing root, four in the right wing root, and one in the top of my canopy. That one had taken my sunglasses off my head without even scratching me (the glasses were a mess, though).

    The shooter's cowl guns had apparently straddled me. The Zero I shot down was the first confirmed victory for the 36th Pursuit Squadron. Confirmation was easy since the Zero had gone down only about a mile from the field. Later confirmations were a lot more difficult to come by, and several were lost entirely. The Zero shot down was that flown by Petty Officer First Class Yoshisuke Arita. It crashed on top of a hill, later named by the Americans as “Bitsabishi Hill”.

    Ferk, ya should be torched alive for posting that.

  7. #52
    Ultimate Member herosrest's Avatar
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    l disagree...... lt's................... Christmas.

    Chin up BD, i'm in the dumps as well. Killin time. Absent friends, man. Absent friends.

    Don't need the message of peace and love right now. l can't stand the hypocrasy. Ducemus!

  8. #53
    Ultimate Member herosrest's Avatar
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    Ya missed part 1 - of a two part post BD - grab a coffee - chill down.....
    KLIK THE COFFEE CUP - YOUK NOW YOU WANT TO. klik da smiley too.

    Quote Originally Posted by herosrest View Post
    Some research. Totally useless but interesting stuff that just links in to itself in a beautiful symmetry of purpose

    In late 1941 the 36th Pursuit Squadron moved to San Francisco, California in preparation for a deployment to the Asian Theater of Operations. The squadron sailed for Brisbane, Australia aboard the SS Mauri on February 12, 1942, a voyage that took 24 days. The squadron trained with P-39s at Lowood, Queenland and later at Antil Plains near Townsville, Australia. On April 20, 1942, the squadron moved to Seven-Mile Drome - CLICK near Port Moresby, New Guinea, which was the last remaining allied stronghold north of Australia. The first contingent flew up in transports on the 26th, and the pilots flew the P-39s up on the 28th. They encountered severe weather and lost 15 planes en route. It was a staggering blow to both Americans and Australians. Another 26 P-39s arrived safely on the 30th. ANECDOTE

    The first combat mission for the 36th PS took place on April 30, 1942. Tasked with a strafing mission at Lae Salamaua, New Guinea, the aircrews encountered 15 to 20 Japanese Zeros. The ensuing dogfight lasted all the way back to Port Moresby. Two pilots of the 36th, Captain Paul G. Brown - CLICK and Captain James J. Bevlock, were forced to land. Capt. Brown claimed probable destruction of one Zero. During the entire war, the 36th would lose 56 men listed as killed or missing in action.

    From April through June 1942, more than 300 enemy planes flew sorties over Seven-Mile Drome in an effort to soften Allied defenses and eliminate Allied air power in that area, prior to a major Japanese invasion effort. The now redesignated 36th Fighter Squadron defended the Drome and claimed 21 enemy planes destroyed during 94 individual combat engagements. The squadron lost 10 planes, but five pilots were saved. Rations were destroyed for the most part and the aircrews lived on bread, jam and tea. 1st Lt. Donald G. McGee was credited with the squadron's first confirmed victory when he shot down a Zero over the Seven-Mile Drome on May 1, 1942. While the 36th FS was establishing its ground echelon force at Port Moresby, the battle of the Coral Sea was underway. In this decisive naval engagement, the Japanese were rebuffed in their efforts to land an invasion force in the vicinity of Port Moresby, thereby marking the beginning of Allied efforts to stem the tide of Japanese conquest.

    After three months of heavy combat operations, the pilots and ground crews of the 36th got some welcome relief from another squadron and returned to their former camp near Townsville. Some of the men were suffering from malaria and dengue fever. The reunion of the squadron at Townsville was a cause for great celebration. The kitchen was opened with coffee and sandwiches, a huge stack of mail was waiting to be opened, and in the middle of the room were three large barrels of beer…and the party ended at 3:00 AM.

    The Japanese sent several planes to bomb Townsville in late July 1942. After the first incident, the pilots of the 36th took to the skies to defend the city. Unfortunately, local antiaircraft batteries made it very dangerous to pursue enemy aircraft. After closer coordination with ground forces, the 36th attacked the invaders on the night of August 1, 1942 and sent the enemy planes hurtling to the ground in flames.

    By September 1942 the 36th FS was located at Milne Bay, New Guinea, and equipped with P-39 Airacobras. They performed patrol and reconnaissance missions, escorted transports, protected Allied shipping to the area of Milne Bay, and during December 1942, patrolled the area between Port Moresby and Buna, New Guinea. Enemy opposition was encountered on only two occasions, the 7th and 28th of December. On the anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, Lt. George S. Welsh, ANECDOTE who had destroyed four enemy aircraft one year earlier, shot down three Japanese planes near Buna.
    Last edited by herosrest; 12-26-2008 at 05:33 AM.
    During deep sleep IT came to me and the future of processing is clear.
    Future processors will primarily be digital tuning radios acting as grid computing nodes.
    Voila. See ya in hell.
    PROCESSING

  9. #54
    Registered User mireland's Avatar
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    oh do kindly shut up...

  10. #55
    Ultimate Member herosrest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by herosrest View Post
    I found this and thought it might cheer things along. http://www.time.com/time/magazine/ar...933032,00.html

    Monday, May. 24, 1943

    Area of Agreement
    General Motors Corp., long harassed by controversy over its Allison aircraft engine, last week distributed a booklet packaged in heavy cellophane, and titled: Airplane Power (with special reference to engines and altitudes). With the booklet was a note from G.M.'s genial Customer Research Director Henry Weaver: "After a long series of controversial sessions with our different engineering groups, aviation experts and military censors, we finally decided ... to omit everything on which the experts are not in full and complete agreement. The enclosed is the result. .. ."

    The enclosed booklet consisted of a handsome cover picturing four Allison-powered planes (Lightning, Airacobra, Tomahawk, Mustang), a noncommittal introduction and conclusion, and 40 blank pages .

    Quote Originally Posted by herosrest View Post
    Co-incidence or fate....

    (Quote - Randy Sohn - Top Gun) I have told this many times before but be patient...We had a latrine built directly across the street from the club...it was the practice for the orderly to burn it out each morning. We also had a Rep from the Allison Corp that was lazy if I cared to put it mildly. It was his practice to gather up all of the newspapers in the club, amble across the street and proceed to seek relief. Well, this particular morning the orderly forgot the matches with which to light the fire to burn the latrine out..They dumped gasoline into the latrine in order to burn it out. Mr Rep, I have forgotten his name, gets all set up for a good mornings browse, and his cigarette, throws the match in the adjoining hole. This causes each lid to stand vertically from the concussion...He takes off across the flat, trousers at half mass, his bottom a cherry red, and his cigarette still unlit."


    During deep sleep IT came to me and the future of processing is clear.
    Future processors will primarily be digital tuning radios acting as grid computing nodes.
    Voila. See ya in hell.
    PROCESSING

  11. #56
    Registered User mireland's Avatar
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    happy new year...too bad the economy will suck.

  12. #57
    Ultimate Member herosrest's Avatar
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    lt won't ............... lt's not the western economies that are in trouble.
    Right about 11/1 yer one horse, energy producers have a nasty li'l shock coming - trillions worth of it.
    During deep sleep IT came to me and the future of processing is clear.
    Future processors will primarily be digital tuning radios acting as grid computing nodes.
    Voila. See ya in hell.
    PROCESSING

  13. #58
    Registered User mireland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by herosrest View Post
    lt won't ............... lt's not the western economies that are in trouble.
    Right about 11/1 yer one horse, energy producers have a nasty li'l shock coming - trillions worth of it.
    I wish I understood HALF of what you said...

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    cosmetics, cosmetics beauty, make up cosmetics

    I can become a party to the conversation?

  15. #60
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    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    970
    Quote Originally Posted by JackPols View Post
    I can become a party to the conversation?
    Not if yer sellin cosmetics, cosmetics beauty, make up cosmetics as you led in with.

    Go ahead, we ain't had a spammer to kick around for a while...not sayin yer a spammer...but if yas are.

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